Memphis rent party, the blues, rock & soul in music's hometown, Robert Gordon
The work Memphis rent party, the blues, rock & soul in music's hometown, Robert Gordon represents a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in Deschutes Public Library.

Resource ID
  • i5e9y3h3Vjc
Provenance
  • http://graph.ebsco.link/source/marc
Rules version
  • 2
Rules
  • http://graph.ebsco.link/transform/marcjs
Type
  • http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/Work
  • http://bibfra.me/vocab/marc/Books
  • http://bibfra.me/vocab/marc/LanguageMaterial
Label
  • Memphis rent party, the blues, rock & soul in music's hometown, Robert Gordon
Main title
  • Memphis rent party
Sub title
  • the blues, rock & soul in music's hometown
Responsibility statement
  • Robert Gordon
Language
  • eng
Summary
  • The fabled city of Memphis has been essential to American music--home of the blues, the birthplace of rock and roll, a soul music capital. We know the greatest hits, but celebrated author Robert Gordon takes us to the people and places history has yet to record. A Memphis native, he whiles away time in a crumbling duplex with blues legend Furry Lewis, stays up late with barrelhouse piano player Mose Vinson, and sips homemade whiskey at Junior Kimbrough's churning house parties. A passionate listener, he hears modern times deep in the grooves of old records by Lead Belly and Robert Johnson. The interconnected profiles and stories in Memphis Rent Party convey more than a region. Like mint seeping into bourbon, Gordon gets into the wider world. He beholds the beauty of mistakes with producer Jim Dickinson (Replacements, Rolling Stones), charts the stars with Alex Chilton (Box Tops, Big Star), and mulls the tragedy of Jeff Buckley's fatal swim. Gordon's Memphis inspires Cat Power, attracts Townes Van Zandt, and finds James Carr always singing at the dark end of the street. A rent party is when friends come together to hear music, dance, and help a pal through hard times; it's a celebration in the face of looming tragedy, an optimism when the wolf is at the door. Robert Gordon finds mystery in the mundane, inspiration in the bleakness, and revels in the individualism that connects these diverse encounters
Bibliography note
  • Includes bibliographical references and index
Illustrations
  • illustrations
Index
  • index present
Literary form
  • non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
OCLC Number
  • 990248461
Table of contents
  • Preface: Give me something different -- Sam Phillips: Sam on Dave -- Jim Dickinson: On the edge -- Ernest Willis: Mississippi reverie -- Mose Vinson: No pain pill -- The Fieldstones: Got to move on down the line -- Lead Belly: Nobody in this world -- Robert Johnson: Hellhound on the money trail -- Junior Kimbrough: Mississippi juke joint -- Charlie Feathers: the onliest -- James Carr: Way out on a voyage -- Otha Turner's fife and drum picnic: Let us eat goat -- Mama Rose Newborn: Useless are the flowers -- Townes Van Zandt: All the federales say -- Jeff Buckley: Northern light -- Bobby "Blue" Bland: Love throat -- Tav Falco: Panther burns forever lasting -- Jerry Lee Lewis: Last killer standing -- Cat power: Kool kween -- Jerry McGill: Very extremely dangerous -- Alex Chilton: No chitterlings today -- Afterword: Stuck inside the Memphis blues again